Is Hadoop always the right solution?

| May 12, 2016

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Hadoop is known as the low cost alternative as organizations progress along the big data pathway. However, this isn't always the case. This video touches on why Hadoop isn't always the answer.

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SyCom Technologies

SyCom offers support solutions that allow our clients to leverage highly-skilled computer and network resources, including preventative maintenance and emergency response to enable your business. From experience and customer feedback, we have created flexible support plans designed for each of our customer's needs. From improving collaboration, securing data, optimizing operations or strategic IT consulting, SyCom solutions enable business agility.

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COVID19: A crisis that necessitates Open Data

Article | August 13, 2020

The coronavirus outbreak in China has grown to a pandemic and is affecting the global health & social and economic dynamics. An ever increasing velocity and scale of analysis — in terms of both processing and access is required to succeed in the face of unimaginable shifts of market; health and social paradigms. The COVID-19 pandemic is accompanied by an Infodemic. With the global Novel Coronavirus pandemic filling headlines, TV news space and social media it can seem as if we are drowning in information and data about the virus. With so much data being pushed at us and shared it can be hard for the general public to know what is correct, what is useful and (unfortunately) what is dangerous. In general, levels of trust in scientists are quite high albeit with differences across countries and regions. A 2019 survey conducted across 140 countries showed that, globally, 72% of the respondents trusted scientists at “high” or “medium” levels. However, the proportion expressing “high” or “medium” levels of trust in science ranged from about 90% in Northern and Western Europe to 68% in South America and 48% in Central Africa (Rabesandratana, 2020). In times of crisis, like the ongoing spread of COVID-19, both scientific & non-scientific data should be a trusted source for information, analysis and decision making. While global sharing and collaboration of research data has reached unprecedented levels, challenges remain. Trust in at least some of the data is relatively low, and outstanding issues include the lack of specific standards, co-ordination and interoperability, as well as data quality and interpretation. To strengthen the contribution of open science to the COVID-19 response, policy makers need to ensure adequate data governance models, interoperable standards, sustainable data sharing agreements involving public sector, private sector and civil society, incentives for researchers, sustainable infrastructures, human and institutional capabilities and mechanisms for access to data across borders. The COVID19 data is cited critical for vaccine discovery; planning and forecasting for healthcare set up; emergency systems set up and expected to contribute to policy objectives like higher transparency and accountability, more informed policy debates, better public services, greater citizen engagement, and new business development. This is precisely why the need to have “open data” access to COVID-19 information is critical for humanity to succeed. In global emergencies like the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, open science policies can remove obstacles to the free flow of research data and ideas, and thus accelerate the pace of research critical to combating the disease. UNESCO have set up open access to few data is leading a major role in this direction. Thankfully though, scientists around the world working on COVID-19 are able to work together, share data and findings and hopefully make a difference to the containment, treatment and eventually vaccines for COVID-19. Science and technology are essential to humanity’s collective response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet the extent to which policymaking is shaped by scientific evidence and by technological possibilities varies across governments and societies, and can often be limited. At the same time, collaborations across science and technology communities have grown in response to the current crisis, holding promise for enhanced cooperation in the future as well. A prominent example of this is the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), launched in 2017 as a partnership between public, private, philanthropic and civil society organizations to accelerate the development of epidemic vaccines. Its ongoing work has cut the expected development time for a COVID-19 vaccine to 12–18 months, and its grants are providing quick funding for some promising early candidates. It is estimated that an investment of USD 2 billion will be needed, with resources being made available from a variety of sources (Yamey, et al., 2020). The Open COVID Pledge was launched in April 2020 by an international coalition of scientists, lawyers, and technology companies, and calls on authors to make all intellectual property (IP) under their control available, free of charge, and without encumbrances to help end the COVID-19 pandemic, and reduce the impact of the disease. Some notable signatories include Intel, Facebook, Amazon, IBM, Sandia National Laboratories, Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Uber, Open Knowledge Foundation, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and AT&T. The signatories will offer a specific non-exclusive royalty-free Open COVID license to use IP for the purpose of diagnosing, preventing and treating COVID-19. Also illustrating the power of open science, online platforms are increasingly facilitating collaborative work of COVID-19 researchers around the world. A few examples include: 1. Research on treatments and vaccines is supported by Elixir, REACTing, CEPI and others. 2. WHO funded research and data organization. 3. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine releases a dataset about the environments that have led to significant clusters of COVID-19 cases,containing more than 250 records with date, location, if the event was indoors or outdoors, and how many individuals became infected. (7/24/20) 4. The European Union Science Hub publishes a report on the concept of data-driven Mobility Functional Areas (MFAs). They demonstrate how mobile data calculated at a European regional scale can be useful for informing policies related to COVID-19 and future outbreaks. (7/16/20) While clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data about COVID-19 is widely available, including genomic sequencing of the pathogen, a number of challenges remain: 1. All data is not sufficiently findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR), or not yet FAIR data. 2. Sources of data tend to be dispersed, even though many pooling initiatives are under way, curation needs to be operated “on the fly”. 3. In addition, many issues arise around the interpretation of data – this can be illustrated by the widely followed epidemiological statistics. Typically, the statistics concern “confirmed cases”, “deaths” and “recoveries”. Each of these items seem to be treated differently in different countries, and are sometimes subject to methodological changes within the same country. 4. Specific standards for COVID-19 data therefore need to be established, and this is one of the priorities of the UK COVID-19 Strategy. A working group within Research Data Alliance has been set up to propose such standards at an international level. Given the achievements and challenges of open science in the current crisis, lessons from prior experience & from SARS and MARS outbreaks globally can be drawn to assist the design of open science initiatives to address the COVID-19 crisis. The following actions can help to further strengthen open science in support of responses to the COVID-19 crisis: 1. Providing regulatory frameworks that would enable interoperability within the networks of large electronic health records providers, patient mediated exchanges, and peer-to-peer direct exchanges. Data standards need to ensure that data is findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable, including general data standards, as well as specific standards for the pandemic. 2. Working together by public actors, private actors, and civil society to develop and/or clarify a governance framework for the trusted reuse of privately-held research data toward the public interest. This framework should include governance principles, open data policies, trusted data reuse agreements, transparency requirements and safeguards, and accountability mechanisms, including ethical councils, that clearly define duties of care for data accessed in emergency contexts. 3. Securing adequate infrastructure (including data and software repositories, computational infrastructure, and digital collaboration platforms) to allow for recurrent occurrences of emergency situations. This includes a global network of certified trustworthy and interlinked repositories with compatible standards to guarantee the long-term preservation of FAIR COVID-19 data, as well as the preparedness for any future emergencies. 4. Ensuring that adequate human capital and institutional capabilities are in place to manage, create, curate and reuse research data – both in individual institutions and in institutions that act as data aggregators, whose role is real-time curation of data from different sources. In increasingly knowledge-based societies and economies, data are a key resource. Enhanced access to publicly funded data enables research and innovation, and has far-reaching effects on resource efficiency, productivity and competitiveness, creating benefits for society at large. Yet these benefits must also be balanced against associated risks to privacy, intellectual property, national security and the public interest. Entities such as UNESCO are helping the open science movement to progress towards establishing norms and standards that will facilitate greater, and more timely, access to scientific research across the world. Independent scientific assessments that inform the work of many United Nations bodies are indicating areas needing urgent action, and international cooperation can help with national capacities to implement them. At the same time, actively engaging with different stakeholders in countries around the dissemination of the findings of such assessments can help in building public trust in science.

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Three smart ways to use low-code development platforms

Article | February 21, 2020

Mayur Shah, senior director of product management at software company WaveMaker, said that low-code platforms encourage collaboration between business units and developers, which can have a long-term impact on a business. "This ability to bring stakeholders and software developers together to work on new applications iteratively is a particular strength of low-code platforms," he said. This visual approach to building software is moving beyond marketing and accounting departments and back to software developers. While some low-code platforms are designed for non-tech business units, WaveMaker is designed to help IT teams be more productive by simplifying the app development process.

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Tech Trends in a Post Covid-19 World

Article | July 2, 2021

When things seem to be falling apart, something needs to hold them together. So in the Covid 19 pandemic, humanity faces its biggest challenges, and technology has come to its rescue. In every other way, technology has kept the world from falling apart. In April 2020, 119 countries announced total lockdown bringing everything to a standstill. Around 1.57 billion students were impacted. They had to adapt themselves to remote learning. The brighter side to this was that the learning process did not stop. Thanks to the evolving technology, students learned remotely through digital classrooms. This is the perfect example to portray that these tech trends in Covid are the hope in these challenging times. Technology needs to be adapted to overcome the hurdles that businesses, learning institutions, remote working, logistics, and everyone faces. There have been emerging tech trends in Covid 19 that have supported and accelerated businesses in all departments. The correct implementation of these tech trends in Covid 19 has granted companies the required boost. Let us look at some of the tech trends in Covid-19 that have assured that the supply and demand management remains consistent and are here to stay for a long time. Tech Trends in Covid 19 World AI Artificial Intelligence was slowly making its way into the world, but the pandemic became its catalyst. As a result, a boost was predicted for the AI industry from 2020 to 2030. But due to the emerging demands, the growth shifted from a decade to a few months. All the sectors implemented AI technologies in their industries. This may support remote working, keep the supply and demand chain seamless, or cater to patients in the hospitals. AI platforms include machine learning, chatbots, deep learning, behaviors technologies, and analytics. The cross combination of these transformative technologies can be implemented to provide solutions to the business. 77% of consumers use AI services directly or indirectly. Moreover, AI is the best tech trend in Covid 19 as it is available 24x7 and operates error-free. Due to its efficiency, speed, and accuracy, AI is the future of all industries. The areas of retail, healthcare, telecommunication, banking, finance, insurance, government, and IT have seen comprehensive growth by implementing AI. IoT With the emergence of IoT, it is possible to think of an utterly digitized future. The Internet of Things has peaked wherein connection between devices is not limited to smartphones and computers. By implementing IoT devices like lights, curtains, ACs, microwaves, etc, can be operated. A smart home is not a dream but a reality. A smart home is also affordable, thanks to the seamless connections of one device connected to all the smart appliances. IoT is playing a considerable role in the emergence of smart cities. IoT is one of the tech trends in Covid 19, which has made the stay at home an easy task. From inbuilt technologies, functional software, voice tech growth to wearable technologies and safety monitoring, IoT ensures that remote working and remote staying are productive, entertaining, and secure. It is estimated that there are 30.73 billion IoT devices in 2020, and their number is increasing tremendously to reach 70.45 billion in 2025. Extended Reality (XR) VR, AR, MR, and XR were the technologies that were highly anticipated to gain momentum in the coming years. But the increase of e-commerce in the pandemic fueled technological innovations. E-commerce websites saw a boost in sales as more and more people started relying on online shopping for their daily needs. This led to the digitization of businesses. As a result, every business company wanted to sell its services uniquely and personalized. This is where AR (Augmented Reality), VR (Virtual Reality), MR (Mixed Reality), and XR (Extended Reality) played their roles. These immersive digital technologies played a vital role in providing the customer’s new ways of shopping and interaction. Customers can virtually sit in a car or visit a real estate property that they wish to buy. And for this, there is no necessity for stepping out of the house. Wearable technologies place you in a virtual world and access everything. For example, they put you on the field to play cricket and give you the natural feeling of playing on the ground while sitting on your sofa. At workplaces, these tech trends in Covid 19 enable employees to hold a meeting together in a conference room even when they are in different parts of the world. Blockchain Technology With so much happening online, security systems for transactions and financial data need ‘extra trust and care.’ Blockchain technology is a type of DLT (Distributed Ledger Technology) wherein transactions are duplicated and distributed across all the networks on the blockchain. Blockchain technology makes it impossible to breach, change or cheat the data on the system. These data-driven technologies have made sectors like finance, healthcare, and online payments secure. Bitcoin uses blockchain technology. Thus, this technology has given rise to digital currencies with limitations of the currency to be used, transferred, and stored. This decentralized system revolutionizes the financial and healthcare market by providing the much-needed security for databases and transactions. In addition, these tech trends in Covid provide enhanced security, which is the need of the hour! 5G This tech trend is here to provide cutting-edge technology. For example, 5G connectivity is claimed to be five times faster than 4G. This technology brings forth an unimaginable experience for cloud services, IoT, mobile devices, and anything that requires the internet. In 2019, 5G prices were high and in the pipeline for general usage. But due to the rise in remote working and collaborative technologies for efficient working, 5G is coming up with affordable plans. 5G has made it possible to convert the dream of smart cities to reality. The increased bandwidth will boost informational technologies, AI, IoT, etc., and confirm that they work efficiently in different geographical terrains. Evolution Due to Technology Trends in Covid-19 These emerging technologies in Covid have brought complete changes in various sectors. Here are a few examples. ● The US and China are utilizing robots and drones for contactless deliveries. Soon this type of service will be prevalent globally. ● Technologies are constantly emerging to support remote work and hybrid work systems. ● VR, AR, MR are utilized to enhance online and distance learning. ● The healthcare sector is assisted by blockchain technology and chatbots for security and easy access. ● Despite theatres and stages being shut, there is no stop to entertainment. Online entertainment experiences are more enhancing. ● IoT, Big data, Blockchain, and other collaborative technologies build a flexible and reliable supply chain management system. And so We Conclude The pandemic is disastrous, but it bought forth the loopholes in the system. It has changed the thinking from “what if?” to “what now?”. It has made adapting to change a lot more easy and flexible. The companies that were adamant about changing and had the age-old processes had to update to tech trends in Covid for seamless functioning. The pandemic should never have occurred, but now that it did, the human race knows that being updated is the necessity of the hour. Furthermore, it has taught us that change is the only permanent thing, and you need to be future-ready by accepting the change. Frequently Asked Questions How is technology changing the world during Covid-19? Technology is evolving rapidly in the Covid-19 phase. This evolution has caused the world to change with it. Robots are delivering goods, and remote working is successful among employees and employers. Technology has changed the world to look beyond the traditional ways and adapt to the new ones, which involve adapting to agility and precision. How the use of technology is creating business value? The use of technology guarantees convenience, speed, and personalization. The businesses that adapted digitalization sustained the Covid period better than others. Technology is helping create business values through increased sales, improved customer efficiency, streamlined processes, meeting changing expectations and demands, and gaining profits. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How is technology changing the world during Covid-19?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Technology is evolving rapidly in the Covid-19 phase. This evolution has caused the world to change with it. Robots are delivering goods, and remote working is successful among employees and employers. Technology has changed the world to look beyond the traditional ways and adapt to the new ones, which involve adapting to agility and precision." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How the use of technology is creating business value?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "The use of technology guarantees convenience, speed, and personalization. The businesses that adapted digitalization sustained the Covid period better than others. Technology is helping create business values through increased sales, improved customer efficiency, streamlined processes, meeting changing expectations and demands, and gaining profits." } }] }

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How SEOs can benefit from using AI and automation

Article | March 10, 2020

Today, optimizing for search is optimizing your customer’s experience. As people query a search engine on their laptop, ask a voice assistant for help, or use their mobile device to find nearby solutions to their needs, brands must be positioned to appear in these critical decision-making moments. Moreover, they must be positioned to respond with relevant, personalized content that speaks directly to the stated need—regardless of device or platform. In fact, real-time marketing (65%) and omnichannel delivery and engagement (52%) were identified as the top two near-term marketing priorities in an Econsultancy/Resulticks survey of more than 340 enterprise brands.

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Spotlight

SyCom Technologies

SyCom offers support solutions that allow our clients to leverage highly-skilled computer and network resources, including preventative maintenance and emergency response to enable your business. From experience and customer feedback, we have created flexible support plans designed for each of our customer's needs. From improving collaboration, securing data, optimizing operations or strategic IT consulting, SyCom solutions enable business agility.

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