CA MOBILE APP ANALYTICS : Getting the Upper Hand in the Mobile App Economy

| January 16, 2017

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Mobile applications have fast become the primary way in which many individuals interact with the world around them. Whether it’s making a bank deposit or a restaurant reservation.

Research shows that reliance on apps continues to grow. Users reported opening apps on their smart-phones 22 percent more often than they had just a year earlier, and overall time “in app” increased 21 percent.

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Guestlogix helps travelers experience the world stress-free by providing them with access to the right products and services, exactly when and where they need them. We partner with carriers and travel companies to generate new revenue streams and improve the customer experience throughout the entire journey, by delivering personalized offers in a single Travel Personalization Platform.

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The 6 Biggest Challenges to AI Marketing Success

Article | July 8, 2021

More and more businesses are utilizing modern-day opportunities that Artificial Intelligence (AI) brings to the digital world. Perhaps, it is the most necessary step for the companies to stay competitive in 2021 and beyond. With the rise of technology, AI-powered marketing platforms are becoming more common and simpler to use. However, this does not mean that they do not have any challenges. A survey conducted by Teradata, a data analytics firm, reports that around 80% of enterprise-level organizations have already embraced some form of AI. Out of them, approximately 32% of businesses use AI algorithms for marketing purposes. However, more than 90% of these companies have already anticipated significant barriers to adopt and integrate AI. In this article, we shed light on the six biggest challenges in AI marketing. It will help you act and avoid common problems if you encounter such roadblocks when integrating AI into your marketing strategy. Here are some highlights of this article: ● Many popular media sources have created hype around AI. Therefore, people, in general, don’t trust it. ● There isn’t enough skilled workforce to fill AI-related positions in organizations. ● AI software needs high-quality data. Unfortunately, maintaining such data quality is not that easy. ● AI software needs significant investment. ● Many small businesses lack IT infrastructure resources. Cloud services help them overcome this problem. As you can now understand, most challenges in AI marketing revolve around business alignment, data, or people. While every organization varies and will face the AI adoption process differently, there are a few common challenges in AI marketing you should be aware of. So, without further ado, let’s take a look at the most common AI challenges that digital marketers face. Lack of Knowledge of AI Systems When it's about total AI implementation, your company’s management must have a deeper understanding of the role of AI in Digital Marketing, the latest AI trends, data challenges, and all other essential aspects. However, many marketers lack a proper understanding of the use of AI technologies in marketing. On top of this, unfortunately, AI comes with a variety of fears and myths. While some people think they need an in-house data science team for complete AI adoption, others believe in those sci-fi fantasies showing how smart robots can end humanity. Insufficient knowledge of AI is one of the biggest challenges in AI marketing. It hinders the AI implementation in several ways and ultimately delays the success. How to get rid of this? First things first — start by acquiring knowledge. It might sound a bit demotivating, but we do not mean you have to be a data scientist for this. You can look at other giants in the industry, carefully analyze how they are deploying AI into their business, and act accordingly. Next, know more about the current AI technologies for marketing — you can either DIY or get help from an expert. Once you have adequate knowledge about it, you know what to expect from AI and what not. Challenges in Integration Deployment and integration of new technology requires skills. Integrating Artificial Intelligence into your business is not an easy task. It is a complicated job and requires proper knowledge. You first have to set up interfaces and other elements to address all your business needs. Such steps may require complex coding. Developers must consider feeding the data into the system, labeling, data storage, data infrastructure needs, and much more while setting up the elements. Then comes the model training and testing part. It is necessary for the following reasons: ● To check the effectiveness of your AI ● Develop a feedback loop for constant improvement ● Data sampling for reducing the stored data and run models even faster The biggest challenge here is — how to confirm if it's working correctly? And, is it worth the money you are investing? Arguably, the only and the most effective way to overcome this hurdle is to work closely with your vendor to ensure that everyone is well aware of the process. Plus, there should not be any limitations in the vendor’s expertise. They should be capable of guiding you beyond building the AI models. When you implement Artificial Intelligence with the right strategy, you indirectly reduce the risk of failure. And, once you successfully implement AI into your system, you will still have to educate your marketers to use it efficiently. In this way, your people can understand how to interpret the results they receive by proper implementation and effective use of the AI model. Poor Data Quality or Lack of Data High-quality data is essential for Artificial Intelligence. Any AI system will come up with poor results if you provide it with insufficient or poor-quality data. As the Big Data world is evolving every day, businesses are gathering vast amounts of data. However, this data is not always up to the mark. It's either insufficient or not good enough to drive a profitable AI marketing strategy. Such data-related challenges in AI marketing prevent companies from capitalizing on Big Data. For this reason, as a business, you should always make sure the data you get is clean and rich in quality. Otherwise, you will experience unsatisfactory results from the AI, and it will negatively influence the overall success of your AI-powered marketing campaigns. Budget Constraints for AI Implementation Many companies lack the necessary budget for implementing AI into the system. Even though AI has the power to provide impressive Returns of Investment (ROI), hefty investments are still one of the biggest challenges in AI marketing, especially for smaller and mid-size companies where the budgets are already stretched. AI-powered platforms come with high-performance hardware and complex software. And, the deployment and maintenance of such components are costly. Such budgeting challenges in AI marketing can limit the opportunities for businesses to utilize AI technology to the fullest. Thankfully, this is now becoming a thing of the past as many affordable AI vendors are coming ahead for the rescue. With them, you do not have to invest in developing in-house solutions. Moreover, they allow you to implement AI tech in a relatively cheaper and faster way. Privacy and Regulations Artificial intelligence is still new to this world, and it's growing at an incredible pace. Chances are that the rules and regulations surrounding AI will change and tighten up over the coming days. The data collection and use of data policies already impact businesses that collect and use data from the customers based in the European Union and drive their Artificial Intelligence systems. The EU implemented GDPR in 2018, and it has made the data collection, and data usage rules even stricter for companies. Ultimately, companies now have to be extra careful while collecting and using customer data. Furthermore, several businesses are restricted from storing the data offsite for regulatory purposes. This means that they can no longer utilize cloud-based AI marketing services. Constantly Changing Marketing Landscape AI is a new marketing tool and can bring disruption to traditional marketing operations. For this reason, marketers evaluate how AI can create new jobs and, at the same time, replace older jobs. One survey suggests that AI marketing tools are more likely to replace the jobs of around 6 out of 10 marketing analysts and marketing specialists over the coming years. Overcoming The Challenges in AI Marketing Yes, such challenges in AI marketing can sometimes slow down your campaigns and affect the outcomes of your AI-driven software. But fortunately, there are a variety of alternative solutions. You need to consider the following steps to rule out the common challenges in AI marketing we discussed earlier. ● Develop a target oriented marketing strategy ● Get the money before you roll out AI in marketing ● Train your marketers ● Recruit the right talent Developing business cases, recruiting talented marketers, measuring the ROI, and getting the required investment — probably, none of these steps sound interesting. But, when it is about the reality check of your AI marketing strategies, they are absolute methods that can open the door to actual Artificial Intelligence payoffs. In the end, every company's responsibility is to make sure that they are using the AI system responsibly so that they can benefit their customers in the best way possible. Frequently Asked Questions How does AI affect marketing? AI helps marketers to spot the latest internet trends and predict them for the future. Such trends are necessary to learn the current marketing facts and eventually help with significant tasks such as budget allocation and setting up the target audience. Plus, AI effectively reduces the money and time usually spent by companies on digital advertising. Simultaneously, it leads businesses towards smarter and more targeted advertising campaigns. As a result, many companies have implemented AI into their digital marketing strategies as it can increase sales and save money at the same time. On a bigger scale, AI has an impact on global trends, sustainability, and scalability. Even government issues, major public concerns, and major cities around the globe have seen positive effects of AI. AI can make the world a better place if used in the right way! How is AI used in digital marketing? Companies are utilizing some stand-out developments for improving the customer experience with the proper use of AI. For example: ● Image recognition technology ● Predictive and targeted content ● Content creation ● Chatbots With these, AI enhances customer support, and provides more relevant and targeted content to the customers. Why is artificial intelligence critical in marketing? With the correct use of Artificial intelligence, businesses can collect, analyze and store a large amount of data. As a result, AI is the best way to learn the latest marketing trends and incorporate them into your marketing strategy. In general, Artificial Intelligence has the power to help your company reach potential customers and provide them with easy access to make purchases. { "@context": "https://schema.org", "@type": "FAQPage", "mainEntity": [{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How does AI affect marketing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "AI helps marketers to spot the latest internet trends and predict them for the future. Such trends are necessary to learn the current marketing facts and eventually help with significant tasks such as budget allocation and setting up the target audience. Plus, AI effectively reduces the money and time usually spent by companies on digital advertising. Simultaneously, it leads businesses towards smarter and more targeted advertising campaigns. As a result, many companies have implemented AI into their digital marketing strategies as it can increase sales and save money at the same time. On a bigger scale, AI has an impact on global trends, sustainability, and scalability. Even government issues, major public concerns, and major cities around the globe have seen positive effects of AI. AI can make the world a better place if used in the right way!" } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "How is AI used in digital marketing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "Companies are utilizing some stand-out developments for improving the customer experience with the proper use of AI. For example: ● Image recognition technology ● Predictive and targeted content ● Content creation ● Chatbots With these, AI enhances customer support and provides more relevant and targeted content to the customers." } },{ "@type": "Question", "name": "Why is artificial intelligence critical in marketing?", "acceptedAnswer": { "@type": "Answer", "text": "With the correct use of Artificial intelligence, businesses can collect, analyze and store a large amount of data. As a result, AI is the best way to learn the latest marketing trends and incorporate them into your marketing strategy. In general, Artificial Intelligence has the power to help your company reach potential customers and provide them with easy access to make purchases." } }] }

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Sitecore 10: Making it easier for marketing teams to be more efficient

Article | August 12, 2020

For organizations that are considering or already leveraging Sitecore to host their digital experience, they’ll be excited to learn that Sitecore announced the release of Sitecore ® Experience Platform ™ 10, (XP 10 for short), plus Sitecore Experience Commerce™ 10 (XC 10).

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COVID19: A crisis that necessitates Open Data

Article | August 13, 2020

The coronavirus outbreak in China has grown to a pandemic and is affecting the global health & social and economic dynamics. An ever increasing velocity and scale of analysis — in terms of both processing and access is required to succeed in the face of unimaginable shifts of market; health and social paradigms. The COVID-19 pandemic is accompanied by an Infodemic. With the global Novel Coronavirus pandemic filling headlines, TV news space and social media it can seem as if we are drowning in information and data about the virus. With so much data being pushed at us and shared it can be hard for the general public to know what is correct, what is useful and (unfortunately) what is dangerous. In general, levels of trust in scientists are quite high albeit with differences across countries and regions. A 2019 survey conducted across 140 countries showed that, globally, 72% of the respondents trusted scientists at “high” or “medium” levels. However, the proportion expressing “high” or “medium” levels of trust in science ranged from about 90% in Northern and Western Europe to 68% in South America and 48% in Central Africa (Rabesandratana, 2020). In times of crisis, like the ongoing spread of COVID-19, both scientific & non-scientific data should be a trusted source for information, analysis and decision making. While global sharing and collaboration of research data has reached unprecedented levels, challenges remain. Trust in at least some of the data is relatively low, and outstanding issues include the lack of specific standards, co-ordination and interoperability, as well as data quality and interpretation. To strengthen the contribution of open science to the COVID-19 response, policy makers need to ensure adequate data governance models, interoperable standards, sustainable data sharing agreements involving public sector, private sector and civil society, incentives for researchers, sustainable infrastructures, human and institutional capabilities and mechanisms for access to data across borders. The COVID19 data is cited critical for vaccine discovery; planning and forecasting for healthcare set up; emergency systems set up and expected to contribute to policy objectives like higher transparency and accountability, more informed policy debates, better public services, greater citizen engagement, and new business development. This is precisely why the need to have “open data” access to COVID-19 information is critical for humanity to succeed. In global emergencies like the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, open science policies can remove obstacles to the free flow of research data and ideas, and thus accelerate the pace of research critical to combating the disease. UNESCO have set up open access to few data is leading a major role in this direction. Thankfully though, scientists around the world working on COVID-19 are able to work together, share data and findings and hopefully make a difference to the containment, treatment and eventually vaccines for COVID-19. Science and technology are essential to humanity’s collective response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Yet the extent to which policymaking is shaped by scientific evidence and by technological possibilities varies across governments and societies, and can often be limited. At the same time, collaborations across science and technology communities have grown in response to the current crisis, holding promise for enhanced cooperation in the future as well. A prominent example of this is the Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovations (CEPI), launched in 2017 as a partnership between public, private, philanthropic and civil society organizations to accelerate the development of epidemic vaccines. Its ongoing work has cut the expected development time for a COVID-19 vaccine to 12–18 months, and its grants are providing quick funding for some promising early candidates. It is estimated that an investment of USD 2 billion will be needed, with resources being made available from a variety of sources (Yamey, et al., 2020). The Open COVID Pledge was launched in April 2020 by an international coalition of scientists, lawyers, and technology companies, and calls on authors to make all intellectual property (IP) under their control available, free of charge, and without encumbrances to help end the COVID-19 pandemic, and reduce the impact of the disease. Some notable signatories include Intel, Facebook, Amazon, IBM, Sandia National Laboratories, Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Uber, Open Knowledge Foundation, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and AT&T. The signatories will offer a specific non-exclusive royalty-free Open COVID license to use IP for the purpose of diagnosing, preventing and treating COVID-19. Also illustrating the power of open science, online platforms are increasingly facilitating collaborative work of COVID-19 researchers around the world. A few examples include: 1. Research on treatments and vaccines is supported by Elixir, REACTing, CEPI and others. 2. WHO funded research and data organization. 3. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine releases a dataset about the environments that have led to significant clusters of COVID-19 cases,containing more than 250 records with date, location, if the event was indoors or outdoors, and how many individuals became infected. (7/24/20) 4. The European Union Science Hub publishes a report on the concept of data-driven Mobility Functional Areas (MFAs). They demonstrate how mobile data calculated at a European regional scale can be useful for informing policies related to COVID-19 and future outbreaks. (7/16/20) While clinical, epidemiological and laboratory data about COVID-19 is widely available, including genomic sequencing of the pathogen, a number of challenges remain: 1. All data is not sufficiently findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable (FAIR), or not yet FAIR data. 2. Sources of data tend to be dispersed, even though many pooling initiatives are under way, curation needs to be operated “on the fly”. 3. In addition, many issues arise around the interpretation of data – this can be illustrated by the widely followed epidemiological statistics. Typically, the statistics concern “confirmed cases”, “deaths” and “recoveries”. Each of these items seem to be treated differently in different countries, and are sometimes subject to methodological changes within the same country. 4. Specific standards for COVID-19 data therefore need to be established, and this is one of the priorities of the UK COVID-19 Strategy. A working group within Research Data Alliance has been set up to propose such standards at an international level. Given the achievements and challenges of open science in the current crisis, lessons from prior experience & from SARS and MARS outbreaks globally can be drawn to assist the design of open science initiatives to address the COVID-19 crisis. The following actions can help to further strengthen open science in support of responses to the COVID-19 crisis: 1. Providing regulatory frameworks that would enable interoperability within the networks of large electronic health records providers, patient mediated exchanges, and peer-to-peer direct exchanges. Data standards need to ensure that data is findable, accessible, interoperable and reusable, including general data standards, as well as specific standards for the pandemic. 2. Working together by public actors, private actors, and civil society to develop and/or clarify a governance framework for the trusted reuse of privately-held research data toward the public interest. This framework should include governance principles, open data policies, trusted data reuse agreements, transparency requirements and safeguards, and accountability mechanisms, including ethical councils, that clearly define duties of care for data accessed in emergency contexts. 3. Securing adequate infrastructure (including data and software repositories, computational infrastructure, and digital collaboration platforms) to allow for recurrent occurrences of emergency situations. This includes a global network of certified trustworthy and interlinked repositories with compatible standards to guarantee the long-term preservation of FAIR COVID-19 data, as well as the preparedness for any future emergencies. 4. Ensuring that adequate human capital and institutional capabilities are in place to manage, create, curate and reuse research data – both in individual institutions and in institutions that act as data aggregators, whose role is real-time curation of data from different sources. In increasingly knowledge-based societies and economies, data are a key resource. Enhanced access to publicly funded data enables research and innovation, and has far-reaching effects on resource efficiency, productivity and competitiveness, creating benefits for society at large. Yet these benefits must also be balanced against associated risks to privacy, intellectual property, national security and the public interest. Entities such as UNESCO are helping the open science movement to progress towards establishing norms and standards that will facilitate greater, and more timely, access to scientific research across the world. Independent scientific assessments that inform the work of many United Nations bodies are indicating areas needing urgent action, and international cooperation can help with national capacities to implement them. At the same time, actively engaging with different stakeholders in countries around the dissemination of the findings of such assessments can help in building public trust in science.

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From In-Person to Virtual: Remotely Onboarding New SDRs

Article | July 31, 2020

In the year and a half that I’ve been an SDR team lead at Outreach, I’ve onboarded more than 90 SDRs across 13 different hiring classes. But since sheltering in place began, I’ve had to onboard 2 classes remotely, and this looks like our new normal for the time being.While it’s not an easy endeavor, the good news is that once you onboard a team remotely, it becomes much easier the next time, and the time after that. The even better news is that you can use the lessons I learned to create your own remote onboarding program and tailor it to your needs.

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Guestlogix helps travelers experience the world stress-free by providing them with access to the right products and services, exactly when and where they need them. We partner with carriers and travel companies to generate new revenue streams and improve the customer experience throughout the entire journey, by delivering personalized offers in a single Travel Personalization Platform.

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